Literacy Narrative 3 Reflection

This assignment allowed me to focus on the writing and revision process. Writing a literacy narrative and then turning it into a comic allowed me to be concise in my language and think critically about the story I was trying to tell. The moving from a comic back to a written narrative gave me a chance to revise my narrative, so it had a clear beginning and end without random pieces of information that did not contribute to the story. The use of a visual outline of my writing made it easier to form my narrative into something that matched my intentions.

       Returning to the Alphabetic narrative after having drawn a comic version allowed the plot of my story to be more precise. Although the whole process of translating a visual back to writing was complicated because the information I had once thought was essential to the story were the main parts that I had to remove. This allowed me to evaluate my literacy narrative as a whole rather than just specific parts improving the process of revision.

       After revising my narrative, I was able to see the parts of the narrative that needed expanding on and the parts that needed to be more precise. The process of writing my revised story was a little different because I already had an established plot and the key points I wanted to bring up, which made writing the narrative easier. After completing the revision process, my narrative still feels the same but is presented in a more straightforward way to the reader.

Literacy Narrative 3

How Productive am I?

by Destiny Mascoll

For this Sunday sketch, I wanted to see how productive I was in the past two weeks of school. I decided to measure five things that I thought made me a productive student and family member. These two weeks were tough to push through despite the rest week, and it is apparent in the decline of hours spent on homework. The data also shows that the more I talked in my class zoom meetings, the less I procrastinated doing my work. This week I was not as productive as I wanted to be, but I am increasing my efforts to make it through the semester.
I chose to visualize my data through a chart because it felt like an accurate way to describe my week. If I could go back in time and redo the assignment, I would choose more categories because I think there are other factors I could have focused on. If I were to continue these visualizations, I would ask different questions to better understand how much I am doing in my life.

Comic Reflection

Writing my literacy narrative as a comic was a challenging but rewarding learning experience. Writing out the narrative was something that I had done before, so it was familiar. While translating my writing into a comic was new and came with its own set of challenges. Some difficulties mainly were about what angles I wanted to include and how to get the main point across. When I created the draft for my comic, it was challenging to choose what words I wanted to have and how they helped develop the story. The first draft of my comic had an issue with wording, and it took away from the primary goal of the story I was trying to present.
Translating my Literacy narrative into a comic allowed me to understand the time and energy of creating a comic. The different choices that authors make allow their story to progress excitingly. In my literacy narrative, many of the details needed when you write a story translate a little differently when you are writing a comic, like time. When you show the progression of time in a written narrative, you can time jump and use ellipses to show change, but in a comic, you can use more panels and perspectives to change how the reader perceives time. Time perception is crucial because it can help the reader understand the importance of certain events and memories in the narrative.
In my comic, I choose to include color on some panels to show emotion or lack thereof. On the classroom panel, I decided not to color it because I wanted the reader to understand that reading in school was a dull experience. While in other panels, I choose to include pale colors and bright colors to show a change in emotion. On other pages, I had many panels on the pages that all offered a different perspective of the same image. This setup goal was to show what I imagined in my head before zooming out into reality on the next page. I don’t think I got many different perspectives in my comic because it was challenging to draw the different stances; I wanted to be straightforward to the reader. Overall, drawing my comic was fun and a little scary because I represented my writing differently.
After I completed my comic, I felt that I could add a lot more to the pages, but I did not have enough time to do so in a way that would be the best representation of my work. My comic could be more in-depth in certain scenes, but while creating it, I felt that if I added more pages that only centered on a specific moment, the comic would not have been clear.
So I sacrificed the length of my comic to have more detailed panels with more color and emotion. The colors and emotions they evoke are essential to the story because it allows the reader to have a more personal connection to the work. Also, the colors make the pages more vivid and entertaining for people who are reading.

The final Comic

Comic Reflection

Writing my literacy narrative as a comic was a challenging but rewarding learning experience. Writing out the narrative was something that I had done before, so it was familiar. While translating my writing into a comic was new and came with its own set of challenges. Some difficulties mainly were about what angles I wanted to include and how to get the main point across. When I created the draft for my comic, it was challenging to choose what words I wanted to have and how they helped develop the story. The first draft of my comic had an issue with wording, and it took away from the primary goal of the story I was trying to present.
Translating my Literacy narrative into a comic allowed me to understand the time and energy of creating a comic. The different choices that authors make allow their story to progress excitingly. In my literacy narrative, many of the details needed when you write a story translate a little differently when you are writing a comic, like time. When you show the progression of time in a written narrative, you can time jump and use ellipses to show change, but in a comic, you can use more panels and perspectives to change how the reader perceives time. Time perception is crucial because it can help the reader understand the importance of certain events and memories in the narrative.
In my comic, I choose to include color on some panels to show emotion or lack thereof. On the classroom panel, I decided not to color it because I wanted the reader to understand that reading in school was a dull experience. While in other panels, I choose to include pale colors and bright colors to show a change in emotion. On other pages, I had many panels on the pages that all offered a different perspective of the same image. This setup goal was to show what I imagined in my head before zooming out into reality on the next page. I don’t think I got many different perspectives in my comic because it was challenging to draw the different stances; I wanted to be straightforward to the reader. Overall, drawing my comic was fun and a little scary because I represented my writing differently.
After I completed my comic, I felt that I could add a lot more to the pages, but I did not have enough time to do so in a way that would be the best representation of my work. My comic could be more in-depth in certain scenes, but while creating it, I felt that if I added more pages that only centered on a specific moment, the comic would not have been clear.
So I sacrificed the length of my comic to have more detailed panels with more color and emotion. The colors and emotions they evoke are essential to the story because it allows the reader to have a more personal connection to the work. Also, the colors make the pages more vivid and entertaining for people who are reading.

The final Comic

The Danger of Procrastination

For my Quadriptych I chose to make a story about procrastination. This is story was an example of some of the days I have been having this week. I chose procrastination because it is something that I have been doing a lot recently and I think many people can relate to it. This type of comic strip is a little longer than a triptych and because of that you have a little more space to develop the story.

Tracing Pages Reflection

The Thesis of my essay is that In Spinning and Stitches, the authors present different ways to confront trauma and control the passing of time to emphasize pivotal moments and feelings in the story. The stopping of time during the comic’s traumatizing event allows the reader to control the pace at which they read to give them the time to deal with the emotions presented.

The process of annotating the pages was a beneficial way of getting my thoughts flowing. But I found it challenging to explain some of the things that I saw on the page. When I started, I knew which page I wanted to trace for Stitches, but choosing one specific page for Spinning was a little more difficult because the page I decided required me to sum up a lot of emotionally weighted information. The tracing process helped me solidify a specific topic that I wanted to discuss in my essay and made the similarities between the two texts more explicit.

Writing an inductive essay for the first time was a disorienting experience. I found it challenging to organize my thoughts and arguments in a way that flowed together coherently. Before writing my essay, I created an outline of the ideas I wanted to make and the evidence I wanted to use when explaining, but I felt a little lost in the process of writing. My thought process toward writing a paper had to be revised to get my argument across.

Through the tracing pages assignment, I learned a lot more about comics’ secret language because I was able to focus more on individual pages and the tools that helped aid in the progression of the narrative. Also, this assignment allowed me to understand the commentary on the trauma that David Smalls and Tillie Walden present in their comics.

Tracing Assignment + Essay

Image credit: Smalls,David. “Stitches” pg. 234

What’s In My Bag

What’s in my bag:

  1. My calculator for calculations on the go!
  2. Another Mask to protect myself.
  3. My air pods to listen to music to avoid small talk with strangers.
  4. A snack because sometimes you get a little hungry.
  5. My computer and its charger to do school work.
  6. A pen.
  7. A water bottle because it is good to stay hydrated. I use bottled water because I have a bad habit of losing my reusable water bottle.
  8. My iPad and Apple Pencil so I can take digital notes.
  9. I usually have Blistex or some type of lip balm, but I can never seem to find them when I need them.
  10. Eye drops for the days I wear contacts because I was not gifted with 20/20 vision. (If I am wearing glasses a cleaning wipe)
  11. And I usually have a book that I am reading for one of my seminar classes.
  12. Also my bag I don’t use it much now that I am doing work at home so I did not include it in the picture.
  13. My phone and my wallet are not included in the picture but are also things that I have in my bag.
  14. My Keys, we have been in this pandemic for so long that I have not really needed my keys, and thus do not have a clue to where they might be.

Due to the pandemic, I have not really needed to pack a bag, so I tried to be as accurate as possible with the things I included. So I tried to fit things in my bag that I would think I would need for a full day of classes if I was going somewhere. In my description, I tried to justify why I had certain things in my bag, a little funny, and hint at bits of my personality. This image is a pretty accurate depiction of what I keep in my bag because I tend to be very practical about the things I carry. I do not want my bag to get too heavy. The image also hints at my inability to keep up with a water bottle and other things, which some people can relate to. Despite my best efforts to have a reusable water bottle, I have lost so many of them at this point, I have lost hope. But this Sunday sketch was a fun way of presenting myself and thinking about the things that I use daily.

Triptych: Among the Stars

Photo 1 , Photo 2, Photo 3

My triptych is a conversation between two people and the miscommunication when discussing their relationship status. I chose this as an idea for my triptych because I wanted it to be funny yet relatable. This specific snippet of the conversations seems to interrupt the peaceful night they have under the stars. Miscommunication is something that happens in a lot of relationships romantic and platonic so someone on some level has experienced a situation similar to this. This was a fun project to find something to turn into a 3 part comic that was funny yet still had some seriousness to it. This comic was a little different to the type of work I have done previously but it was a fun way to interact with my work.

When it Rains…

Rain cloud photo and confetti photo

For my combophoto I choose to make it look like it was raining confetti. I used a cloud photo and a picture of falling confetti and edited them to make it look like the clouds were raining heart shaped confetti. When I was trying to make my combophoto it was difficult to find the pictures I wanted at the right angles. Due to my limited knowledge of photo editing I needed to find pictures that required less complex editing processes. I got to manipulate different photos to make an image I wanted and got to learn more about photo editing through this assignment.