Lucius Fox Setup

For my Sunday Sketch I decided to recreate a scene from the Dark Knight where Lucius Fox is in front of his giant computer with many screens helping out Batman. I got this idea because my friends often call my computer set up in my room the “Lucius Fox setup” so I thought it would be fitting to recreate this scene. Unfortunately I do not have as many screens as Lucius Fox so instead I tiled many pictures of blue security camera footage across my monitor to make it appear like I have that many screens. Unfortunately my dress shirt is in the wash, so instead I made a substitute for a blue jacket. While the angle and posture is not 100% the same, I made slight adjustments because if I took the movie’s angle, and Morgan Freeman’s you would see my wall instead of the monitor which I think is the main focal point of this scene.

Halfa Kucha Reflection

I took a different approach from most of my pieces of writing when I began constructing my argument for this Halfa-Kucha. I tried to combine aspects from previous assignments namely the tracing pages assignment and the second part of the literacy narrative. Like the tracing pages assignment I tried to build this from the ground up. Because I have digital copies of both Kindred and Stitches, I began by screenshotting various scenes that were related to trauma or recovery, and then I annotated each screenshot. Using the annotations I chose a related Judith Herman quote and began drafting up the structure of the argument. Here, I took inspiration from the second part of my literacy narrative where I try to represent my flow of ideas in an abstract, non-linear way. I drew arrows, concept maps, and webs. Finally I linearized this representation into the series of slides we see above.

For the slides I took a minimalist approach due to the nature of the presentation being just under three and a half minutes. Due to the short time, my words would be dense and important so I did not want to draw attention away from the argument by having ornate slides. Writing the script for this Halfa Kucha was challenging because I did not want to speak fast, because comic panels are already dense and the audience’s’ attention would be split. I tried to take a minimalist approach with my words, and I timed how long it would take to say each slide at a moderate pace.

Overall I liked this presentation style because it forced you to be minimalist, making sure every choice I took served a purpose. I also think the way I went about constructing this argument was more aligned with how I think, so I will definitely be using a similar method in the future. One thing that I might change in a different setting is getting rid of the timing and making it just slightly less scripted to make have a more conversational tone for certain audiences.

Halfa Kucha Reflection

I took a different approach from most of my pieces of writing when I began constructing my argument for this Halfa-Kucha. I tried to combine aspects from previous assignments namely the tracing pages assignment and the second part of the literacy narrative. Like the tracing pages assignment I tried to build this from the ground up. Because I have digital copies of both Kindred and Stitches, I began by screenshotting various scenes that were related to trauma or recovery, and then I annotated each screenshot. Using the annotations I chose a related Judith Herman quote and began drafting up the structure of the argument. Here, I took inspiration from the second part of my literacy narrative where I try to represent my flow of ideas in an abstract, non-linear way. I drew arrows, concept maps, and webs. Finally I linearized this representation into the series of slides we see above.

For the slides I took a minimalist approach due to the nature of the presentation being just under three and a half minutes. Due to the short time, my words would be dense and important so I did not want to draw attention away from the argument by having ornate slides. Writing the script for this Halfa Kucha was challenging because I did not want to speak fast, because comic panels are already dense and the audience’s’ attention would be split. I tried to take a minimalist approach with my words, and I timed how long it would take to say each slide at a moderate pace.

Overall I liked this presentation style because it forced you to be minimalist, making sure every choice I took served a purpose. I also think the way I went about constructing this argument was more aligned with how I think, so I will definitely be using a similar method in the future. One thing that I might change in a different setting is getting rid of the timing and making it just slightly less scripted to make have a more conversational tone for certain audiences.

Data Viz

Graph Produced on NCSS

With housing applications and the several quizzes and exams I’ve had in this short time span (and many more to come in the following weeks), I decided to track my overall tiredness levels, productivity levels, with my overall rating of my room’s tidiness. When I first heard of this assignment I immediately thought of scatter plots because that is an easy way to find if there are correlations or not. Unfortunately 4 dimensional or 5 dimensional scatterplots are hard to visualize, so I settled for a 3 dimensional one. The scales are all from 0-10, which is subjective by nature, but I just went off how I felt that day, so it is unfortunately not a very scientific process of scaling.

After taking down the data, I plotted a 3D scatterplot on NCSS and asked it to perform a regression analysis. In essence, I asked it to find any trends, which is indicated by the plane that looks like a red net. The error between this trend (the plane) and the data points is marked by the lines connecting data points to the plane. Overall, the more productive I was, the cleaner my room tended to be. The less tired I was the more cleaner my room tended to be as well, though a weaker correlation. There was no strong correlation between my tiredness and my productivity, which was strange. I wonder if this has any bad long term effects? In reality I could have plotted these three variables onto three two dimensional scatterplots and conducted analyses on all three, but I thought doing this was more fun, and I learned something new. Though this process was not very scientific it was still very fun and creative, but if I had to do this next time, I would probably try to make the scaling scientific and probably find an easier way to visualize the data if it had more variables.

Literacy Narrative Part 3 Reflection

The comic that I drew in the second part of the literacy narrative was very different from my written narrative in part one. The second part of literacy narrative felt more true to my experiences than the first part. I stated in the reflection from part one, I felt uncomfortable writing that narrative and the effect is that the writing feels distant and less personal. In this third part of the narrative I return to the written medium after the comic. Because the comic was so different, most of the narrative is new to match what occurs in the comic. In the end, I think that the third part felt more personal and simpler because I started from the comic. Writing it felt less analytical, and it felt more like I was telling a story. Taking all three parts into consideration, I think this whole collection really demonstrates that my mind doesn’t really work in terms of words, and that I have to translate ‘images’ in my mind into those words. The first part of the narrative felt uncomfortable because I went straight from my thoughts to writing. The comic as a medium in the second part was a better representation of my thoughts because it combined images and words, which felt more comfortable to me. The comic drawing process was almost like an intermediate step of converting my thoughts to words, because I was not limited to only using words. Once this intermediate step was done, it was much easier to fully convert the narrative into words because part of the work was already done. This lead to the more comfortable feeling of this third part.

Literacy Narrative Part 2 Reflection

Drawing this comic was a very enjoyable experience. I did not end up sticking to my original written narrative in part one. Instead, I took certain elements from the written narrative and weaved it into a different story. This helped in creating a more engaging comic because this new story had more visual potential than the recounting of events that led up to my writing style. The written narrative was more linear, and I did not think that it would make an engaging comic. When I came up with my idea for the comic, ideas started going off in my head, almost in a sporadic and non-linear way, which was the opposite of the original. This worked well for the comic medium because I could arrange my ideas spatially in two dimensions rather than the linear one dimension. My many ideas lead me to make a series of choices, but once they were made through the storyboard draft, it felt much easier to draw this comic than it was to write the narrative.

The first page is most similar to my narrative. It is almost like a traditional comic where you have three panels and images and text inside them. Instead of regular side-by-side rectangular panels, I decided to use overlapping puzzle pieces. This not only hints at what is to come in the comic, but also creates early conflict because the overlapping puzzles block the audience’s view of the scenes. I hoped this conflict would encourage the audience to continue reading and find the resolution of the first page in the last page, where a completed puzzle can be found.

A lot of what I am trying to do in this comic is to encourage the audience to read outside of the panels by going against convention. The second page uses squiggly rectangles as panels. This creates a connection to the bottom panel on the first page where I am thinking, but also echoes the traditional thought bubbles in most comics, in order to signify that I am talking about my thoughts. I also try to push the readers to look outside the panels by drawing a web that connects the second panel to the others. Thus, creating a story that is not bound by the panels.

The third page combines the puzzle piece theme and the squiggly rectangle theme, bringing some sense of resolution from the two drastically different panel styles in the two previous pages. Despite this, the worm’s eye view perspective of the scene highlights the difficulty of the task, which ultimately resolves in a nice fitting puzzle in the last page, concluding both the story in the panels and the story outside of the panels.

Overall, this was a very fun process. I think that this medium really brought out my creative side compared to the written narrative. If I had more time, I would probably try to incorporate some more detail and color. Right now, it is monochrome, and I don’t think there’s any particular significance in the colors I use. I wonder if using or adding different colors will change the meaning and story of the comic?  

Spooky Money

For the quadriptych I decided to make it using the same characters from my triptych. I wanted to see how the same or similar ideas would change from a triptych to a quadriptych. This piece is self-standing, but you can get some more interesting ideas if you read both this piece and the triptych. If you read this piece alone you might think that these two already know one another, but the triptych reveals that the ghost recruited the skeleton. Also, in the triptych it was unclear if the ghost could control lightning, but it looks like he can in this piece.

What was difficult about composing this piece was finding the right plot of events that would fit into the four panel style. I found it actually more difficult to compose the quadriptych than the triptych because you need a middle conflict that can be broken down into two essential panels. Each panel needed to be important such that when you remove one panel, it makes the story unclear. Creating the two conflict panels was difficult, but reading it as an audience, to me, felt more satisfying than reading the triptych because of that prolonged tension. The final panel is more lighthearted, giving a resolution to that tension which makes it satisfying to the reader. The beginning and ending panels still feel similar to the triptych because only one panel represented the beginning and the end. I think it would be interesting to see how to prolong the beginning/ending panels and what effect that has on me drawing it and me reading it.

Tracing Pages Reflection

The Tracing Pages assignment was something that I’ve never done before. I thought that the process of first tracing, then annotating and then finally writing the essay was very conductive to the inductive style of writing. Normally I try to start from the claim or thesis, but the tracing and the annotating made me notice patterns, which allowed me to make a claim. The challenge was actually choosing which patterns to include because 500-750 words is limited space.

It was almost like building from the ground up, which mimics the style of the essay. Even though this was new, I have done something similar to inductive writing, but we did not have the last section where we synthesized what we talked about. The synthesis was definitely the hardest part to put together because it was completely new and it was almost like backwards thinking. What really helped me through this was to write and then come back to it some other time to see if the ideas in the synthesis were coherent.

Overall I think that this essay assignment helped me better understand the Secret Language of comics. Language is built from small units and writing or thinking inductively throughout this assignment helped me uncover those small units and piece them together into a message. You can read this essay where I make the claim that both Spinning and Stitches use dualities in time and color to create a relationship with the audience. You’ll see how the two things create a message within the story and how they combine to serve an audience.

What’s in my bag?

In my bag I have a Surface Pro 7, laptop charger, iPhone charger, sunglasses, regular glasses, a Ti-84 calculator, earbuds, earplugs, pencil case and my key. I try to go paperless, which is why I carry a Surface Pro with me because it doubles as both a tablet and a laptop, and it is light too. However, not everyone is paperless, so I carry a pencil case with me in case I need to write things physically down. Earbuds are essential in our Zoom environment, though I don’t know why I carry earplugs with me… I carry sunglasses, because Atlanta is sunny sometimes, and then I need glasses because I am near sighted in my left eye.

I think the things in my bag represent me because the items are very practical, but also very organized. The laptop has its own case within the bag, the chargers are in a black drawstring bag in the backpack, my earbuds are in their case, my glasses are in their case, and my stationery is in my pencil case. All of these mini-compartments are then housed within the large bag, making it very organized. Even the spacing of the items on my bed is very compartmental.