Halfa Kucha Reflection

I took a different approach from most of my pieces of writing when I began constructing my argument for this Halfa-Kucha. I tried to combine aspects from previous assignments namely the tracing pages assignment and the second part of the literacy narrative. Like the tracing pages assignment I tried to build this from the ground up. Because I have digital copies of both Kindred and Stitches, I began by screenshotting various scenes that were related to trauma or recovery, and then I annotated each screenshot. Using the annotations I chose a related Judith Herman quote and began drafting up the structure of the argument. Here, I took inspiration from the second part of my literacy narrative where I try to represent my flow of ideas in an abstract, non-linear way. I drew arrows, concept maps, and webs. Finally I linearized this representation into the series of slides we see above.

For the slides I took a minimalist approach due to the nature of the presentation being just under three and a half minutes. Due to the short time, my words would be dense and important so I did not want to draw attention away from the argument by having ornate slides. Writing the script for this Halfa Kucha was challenging because I did not want to speak fast, because comic panels are already dense and the audience’s’ attention would be split. I tried to take a minimalist approach with my words, and I timed how long it would take to say each slide at a moderate pace.

Overall I liked this presentation style because it forced you to be minimalist, making sure every choice I took served a purpose. I also think the way I went about constructing this argument was more aligned with how I think, so I will definitely be using a similar method in the future. One thing that I might change in a different setting is getting rid of the timing and making it just slightly less scripted to make have a more conversational tone for certain audiences.

Halfa Kucha Reflection

I took a different approach from most of my pieces of writing when I began constructing my argument for this Halfa-Kucha. I tried to combine aspects from previous assignments namely the tracing pages assignment and the second part of the literacy narrative. Like the tracing pages assignment I tried to build this from the ground up. Because I have digital copies of both Kindred and Stitches, I began by screenshotting various scenes that were related to trauma or recovery, and then I annotated each screenshot. Using the annotations I chose a related Judith Herman quote and began drafting up the structure of the argument. Here, I took inspiration from the second part of my literacy narrative where I try to represent my flow of ideas in an abstract, non-linear way. I drew arrows, concept maps, and webs. Finally I linearized this representation into the series of slides we see above.

For the slides I took a minimalist approach due to the nature of the presentation being just under three and a half minutes. Due to the short time, my words would be dense and important so I did not want to draw attention away from the argument by having ornate slides. Writing the script for this Halfa Kucha was challenging because I did not want to speak fast, because comic panels are already dense and the audience’s’ attention would be split. I tried to take a minimalist approach with my words, and I timed how long it would take to say each slide at a moderate pace.

Overall I liked this presentation style because it forced you to be minimalist, making sure every choice I took served a purpose. I also think the way I went about constructing this argument was more aligned with how I think, so I will definitely be using a similar method in the future. One thing that I might change in a different setting is getting rid of the timing and making it just slightly less scripted to make have a more conversational tone for certain audiences.

Halfa Kucha Reflection

The writing process for my halfa kucha was similar to writing a paper. I brainstormed preliminary ideas about how trauma and recovery were portrayed in the two books I chose. I started with one book and then it was easier for me to directly compare the other book to those points. After I had my main points, I wrote a script for what I wanted to say in each subsection. There were two big subsections, the two themes about society’s view of the characters’ trauma, and within each subsection there were three detailed section, one for each book and one related to the quotes from Herman. I went back through, timed myself, and cut down significantly on the script so that each “paragraph” only took up 20 seconds or less. I normally write a lot of fluff because it sometimes takes me a while to get to the point depending on the writing piece I’m working on. I was surprised I didn’t have a lot more to take out when editing.

I chose visuals after writing my script. It was easier this way because I only had to look for frames that aligned with what I had written. I think it would’ve been personally harder to do it vice versa. I tried to choose scenes that the audience would recognize and wouldn’t take too much time to read. I overall didn’t mind this style of presentation. The time limit helped me cut down on what I wanted to say in order to get to the point and be concise. While giving the presentation, I didn’t like the time limit because it felt rushed and naturally, I ten to take a longer time to think about what I want to say before talking. There were points in my presentation where I had to forgo important points that I wish I had time to bring up or clarify. I liked how other people’s presentations were even more concise and really easy to follow although I think it would take a lot of time and editing for me to cut down further in my writing.

Halfa Kucha Reflection

Due: Friday 4/16

Export your halfa kucha slideshow as a set of images (in Powerpoint: File > Export… and then in File Format select jpeg and “save every slide.” Powerpoint will create a subfolder where you tell it to and save each of your ten slides as images). Then in your WordPress dashboard create a new post and upload those images to a Slideshow block.

Then write a couple of paragraphs reflecting on the process of writing and then giving the presentation. How was it different to construct an argument that you were giving to the class as a presentation than to write an essay? How did you make choices about the structure of your argument? If you made a choice to organize your presentation in a certain way so that your audience would follow it more clearly, is that something that you could also make use of in your written work? Was your analytical thinking process any different?

What decisions did you make about the visuals for your presentation? How did you go about creating an impact for the slides that accompany your spoken words?

What did you learn by giving this type of presentation, where you had no control of the timing of the slides and couldn’t put much in the way of text on your slides, as compared to other presentations you have given? What did you notice about your classmates’ presentations that you might think about incorporating into your own presentations in the future?

Halfa Kucha assignment prompt