Making Your Problem Somebody Else’s Problem: The Road to Recovery

When creating this powerpoint, I organized my thoughts and argument based on the number of slides and my time limit. Similar to writing a paper, I did my researched and created a thesis as I normally would. Many times when writing a paper, as I write, I formalize and secure my argument through the writing process. With this project, I designated a specific number of slides to trauma and a specific number to healing (5 and 5) and made sure to have relatively the same amount dedicated to each novel. I struggled to keep the information down when practicing my presentation. Every time I presented I changed some of the information said depending on the time. It was difficult to think on my feet with the extreme time crunch. If, however, the project was twice as long, I still would have struggled because I would then try to include twice as much content instead of slowing down and going in more depth.
I do think it was helpful to organize my work with the mindset I had making this presentation. In writing, I sometimes lose my goal and have similar arguments in different sections. This project forced me to look at it as a whole rather than slide by slide to keep with the time and spacing. I can definitely carry this way of thinking into my written work to avoid redundancy and rambling. Removing the majority of words from a presentation makes the presentation much more engaging. It forced me as the audience to pay more attention because my brain couldn’t use written cues to shortcut my attention. I will take this into my future projects as well as emphasizing my focus on managing the time spent on each slide.

Halfa Kucha Reflection

I took a different approach from most of my pieces of writing when I began constructing my argument for this Halfa-Kucha. I tried to combine aspects from previous assignments namely the tracing pages assignment and the second part of the literacy narrative. Like the tracing pages assignment I tried to build this from the ground up. Because I have digital copies of both Kindred and Stitches, I began by screenshotting various scenes that were related to trauma or recovery, and then I annotated each screenshot. Using the annotations I chose a related Judith Herman quote and began drafting up the structure of the argument. Here, I took inspiration from the second part of my literacy narrative where I try to represent my flow of ideas in an abstract, non-linear way. I drew arrows, concept maps, and webs. Finally I linearized this representation into the series of slides we see above.

For the slides I took a minimalist approach due to the nature of the presentation being just under three and a half minutes. Due to the short time, my words would be dense and important so I did not want to draw attention away from the argument by having ornate slides. Writing the script for this Halfa Kucha was challenging because I did not want to speak fast, because comic panels are already dense and the audience’s’ attention would be split. I tried to take a minimalist approach with my words, and I timed how long it would take to say each slide at a moderate pace.

Overall I liked this presentation style because it forced you to be minimalist, making sure every choice I took served a purpose. I also think the way I went about constructing this argument was more aligned with how I think, so I will definitely be using a similar method in the future. One thing that I might change in a different setting is getting rid of the timing and making it just slightly less scripted to make have a more conversational tone for certain audiences.

Halfa Kucha Reflection

I took a different approach from most of my pieces of writing when I began constructing my argument for this Halfa-Kucha. I tried to combine aspects from previous assignments namely the tracing pages assignment and the second part of the literacy narrative. Like the tracing pages assignment I tried to build this from the ground up. Because I have digital copies of both Kindred and Stitches, I began by screenshotting various scenes that were related to trauma or recovery, and then I annotated each screenshot. Using the annotations I chose a related Judith Herman quote and began drafting up the structure of the argument. Here, I took inspiration from the second part of my literacy narrative where I try to represent my flow of ideas in an abstract, non-linear way. I drew arrows, concept maps, and webs. Finally I linearized this representation into the series of slides we see above.

For the slides I took a minimalist approach due to the nature of the presentation being just under three and a half minutes. Due to the short time, my words would be dense and important so I did not want to draw attention away from the argument by having ornate slides. Writing the script for this Halfa Kucha was challenging because I did not want to speak fast, because comic panels are already dense and the audience’s’ attention would be split. I tried to take a minimalist approach with my words, and I timed how long it would take to say each slide at a moderate pace.

Overall I liked this presentation style because it forced you to be minimalist, making sure every choice I took served a purpose. I also think the way I went about constructing this argument was more aligned with how I think, so I will definitely be using a similar method in the future. One thing that I might change in a different setting is getting rid of the timing and making it just slightly less scripted to make have a more conversational tone for certain audiences.

Halfa-Kucha Reflection

Constructing an argument to present to the class felt like creating a compressed essay, in a way, yet not quite. It felt as if I was typing an essay while I typed my script but a big difference was the way my script was much shorter—only 2 pages long—compared to my essays which are usually 3-4 pages, largely due to the fact that I wasn’t going into extreme detail presenting my argument. In an essay, I’ll spend lengthy paragraphs trying to prove whatever I’m arguing, however constructing my argument for this format forced me to just cut straight to the chase and share my main points within the time limit. I think the way I decided to organize my presentation is something I could make use of in my written work, mainly because I started off my planning as if I was writing an essay: presenting my argument and pointing to specific evidence supporting it. Because I was sort of stuck in this mindset of crafting like a mini essay to then just translate into a visual presentation—this was very much comparable to my process in my seminar class last semester in which I had to write a research paper and make a powerpoint presentation—my analytical thinking process generally did not feel any different. For the visuals of my presentation, I decided to go with the basic setup of literally presenting what I was saying. I know for me personally, if there’s no words on a presentation, I can keep up and remain engaged if I can see the connection between the oral argument and the visuals presented, so that’s why I went with that decision for my presentation.

By giving this type of presentation, it helped me realize how important it is to choose appropriate and significant visuals and to decide what are the most important parts of your argument to emphasize on within the time limit of the slide. Because there was time constraints per slide, it made me organize much more specifically what I said and when; if I had to say a bit more about a certain topic I extended it out for at least 2 slides but otherwise I tried to stick to “one thing per slide”. This presentation also made me stick to a very concise script—I couldn’t go off on tangents or if I stuttered I had to recover immediately because the clock was ticking on the current slide. While I had to stay synchronized with my automatically switching slides, I also had to be speaking slow enough so my peers could comprehend and keep up with what I was saying. Previous presentations I’ve done only have an overall presentation time limit so I chose how long I got to spend on certain slides—which unfortunately sometimes made me include too many things per slide and most likely minimized the engagement and focus of my audience. One thing I noticed in some of my classmates’ presentations was including specific quotes on their slides. Although we all stuck to mainly images, I realized that emphasizing specific quotes allows the audience to capture the significance of it—I think if I had included the quotes I cited orally it would’ve definitely helped emphasize my argument.

Halfa Kucha



In high school, I did quite of few of presentations, and I was in theatre for 3 semester. I still get the jitters before doing something in front of a crowd, and I am fairly confident in my presentation skills. Before working on the Halfa Kucha, it thought that it would be easy to an extent because I already had an idea of what I wanted to say and present. While working on it, I went through the graphic novels looking for panels that are relevant to my vague idea then I constructed my argument. Looking back, I wished that I constructed my argument first then pick out panels. That way I can focus more on the argument and not get lost in which panels I should put in the presentation. I wasted a lot of time picking the right panels. As for the argument, I wanted to put more into it, but the time restraint held me back. Which is good for this type of assignment, it would be harder to stray off path, and I focused more on the important stuff. I liked not having to create an introduction for the presentation, describing the plot. I could just get right into it. If I were to implement that into analytical writing, I would focus on the body and then right the introduction and conclusion.

For the panels on the presentation, I wanted to focus more on what is drawn on the panel rather than the text. For Teddy’s slides, I cut out the frames where he facial expression was showing. In Sabrina, the facial expressions are kinda bland. However, there are the few times where it more realistic features to it.

Whenever I give presentations, I try not to be that one person who just reads off the slides. This assignment made sure that you won’t read off the slides. I also did not need to worry about typing my argument out; I could just say it. With the slides moving automatically, I had to make sure what I said was relevant with each slide, and I had a limited time to say it which was nerve racking. Towards the end of the presentation, I kinda went off in a tangent and was not able to say what I wanted too. Remembrance and reconnection can happen at the same time. But why? who knows because I couldn’t finish. From my fellow students’ presentation, I would try to slow down myself down and have flashcards to keep myself on track. As for future presentations in general, I would try to put less on the slides and just talk about it.

Halfa Kutcha

I have been half dreading this assignment all semester, I don’t know what happened to me in quarantine but last semester I started to get stage fright for the first time in my life. All through out high school I just never really cared about my peers watching me but something about zooms makes it all the more dreadful. Writing for this was much different than the essay’s, I have the comfort of editing during the writing process when I am working on a essay but doing this I only had my thoughts and my flash cards. While practicing for my presentation alone I found my brain running faster than my mouth and I would trip over words and start to stutter.

Organizing my slide show was a lot easier. I liked the idea of focusing on each of the three stages of recovery so I decided to make each section color coordinated to make it easier for both me and my audience to follow. Without doing anything outwardly visual I don’t know how I would translate that into writing other than just breaking my sections up into paragraphs. I don’t think my analytical process what any different in the making of this. I think the manor helped shaped the final product, such as me not using as complex sentences structure and having a an actually visual tp point out instead of trying to portray whatever I was talking about in the text.

I thought the timing was a really interesting part of this process. When it comes to academic situations I tend to be a pretty concise person. However I still found myself racing against the time limit on some slides. I really liked everyone else’s slides, if I were to do this again I would try and make an effect to make mine more visually appealing instead of just having a page from the comic I am referencing.

Halfa Kucha Reflection

Formulating my argument for my Halfa Kucha was not that different than forming an argument from an essay. First, I made a list of all the books we have read this semester, and I defined what I thought the trauma was in each work. After analyzing my notes, I noticed that there were many similarities between Teddy from Sabrina and David from Stitches. I then specifically found images in which Teddy and David are similar in coping with their trauma. I then checked the end of the works to compare their healing processes. I structured my presentation pretty similarly to how I would write an essay for this topic. I discussed each work on its own and then analyzed the differences and similarities between the two. If I was to make my presentation into a written work, I would not change to the format/organization too much. I thought my presentation resembled an essay in that I made a claim in the beginning followed by evidence and a short conclusion.

I wanted to choose visuals from each Sabrina and Stitches that would support my stated argument. For example, I found images in both Sabrina and Stitches in which Teddy and David, respectively, express their anger. For a majority of my presentation, I knew roughly what I wanted to say and found corresponding images. In some cases, the images would give more ideas, which in some cases made me change/condense some aspects of my argument. An example of this at the beginning of my presentation was when I commented on the facial expressions of both Teddy and David. Commenting on these facial expressions helped me develop my argument further to say that David was more poised to recover.

By giving this type of presentation, I learned that effective presentations do not have to be excessively long. In some instances, being perfectly concise can perhaps be as effective as giving several examples to support your argument. Something that I saw from other presentations was the inclusion of quotes. Although the medium calls for having a picture on each slide, I thought that the inclusion of a power quote on a slide was rather effective. If the presenter has the quote on screen, it is definitely more effective that way than just reading it. I think I will use this presentation technique in the future.  

Halfa Kucha Reflection

The writing process for my halfa kucha was similar to writing a paper. I brainstormed preliminary ideas about how trauma and recovery were portrayed in the two books I chose. I started with one book and then it was easier for me to directly compare the other book to those points. After I had my main points, I wrote a script for what I wanted to say in each subsection. There were two big subsections, the two themes about society’s view of the characters’ trauma, and within each subsection there were three detailed section, one for each book and one related to the quotes from Herman. I went back through, timed myself, and cut down significantly on the script so that each “paragraph” only took up 20 seconds or less. I normally write a lot of fluff because it sometimes takes me a while to get to the point depending on the writing piece I’m working on. I was surprised I didn’t have a lot more to take out when editing.

I chose visuals after writing my script. It was easier this way because I only had to look for frames that aligned with what I had written. I think it would’ve been personally harder to do it vice versa. I tried to choose scenes that the audience would recognize and wouldn’t take too much time to read. I overall didn’t mind this style of presentation. The time limit helped me cut down on what I wanted to say in order to get to the point and be concise. While giving the presentation, I didn’t like the time limit because it felt rushed and naturally, I ten to take a longer time to think about what I want to say before talking. There were points in my presentation where I had to forgo important points that I wish I had time to bring up or clarify. I liked how other people’s presentations were even more concise and really easy to follow although I think it would take a lot of time and editing for me to cut down further in my writing.

Halfa Kucha Reflection

Due: Friday 4/16

Export your halfa kucha slideshow as a set of images (in Powerpoint: File > Export… and then in File Format select jpeg and “save every slide.” Powerpoint will create a subfolder where you tell it to and save each of your ten slides as images). Then in your WordPress dashboard create a new post and upload those images to a Slideshow block.

Then write a couple of paragraphs reflecting on the process of writing and then giving the presentation. How was it different to construct an argument that you were giving to the class as a presentation than to write an essay? How did you make choices about the structure of your argument? If you made a choice to organize your presentation in a certain way so that your audience would follow it more clearly, is that something that you could also make use of in your written work? Was your analytical thinking process any different?

What decisions did you make about the visuals for your presentation? How did you go about creating an impact for the slides that accompany your spoken words?

What did you learn by giving this type of presentation, where you had no control of the timing of the slides and couldn’t put much in the way of text on your slides, as compared to other presentations you have given? What did you notice about your classmates’ presentations that you might think about incorporating into your own presentations in the future?

Halfa Kucha assignment prompt